Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

2021 May 05

Medical Racism from 1619 to the Present: History Matters

4:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a disproportionate impact on communities of color in the United States. In addition, the uneven and unequal distribution of vaccines is raising the issue of mistrust and vaccine hesitancy in these same communities. Lack of trust in the US healthcare system among communities of color is inextricably linked to the history of systemic racism in this country. With fewer than half of Black American adults indicating that they will definitely or probably get vaccinated against COVID-19, understanding the roots of this hesitancy—which dates back centuries—is...

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2021 Mar 15

Transients: A Poetry Reading and Discussion with Douglas Ridloff

4:00pm

Location: 

Zoom

Douglas Ridloff is the founder and executive director of ASL Slam, a nonprofit organization that creates safe spaces for the Deaf community to thrive in the many modalities of their native language. By hosting a monthly event at the Nuyorican Poets Cafe in New York City and then bringing ASL Slam and his unique style of visual vernacular poetry to Australia, Cuba, France, Germany, Israel, Jamaica, Russia, the United Kingdom, and beyond, Ridloff has fostered engagement and enthusiasm for sign languages worldwide...

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2021 Mar 31

MUTINY: poems

12:00pm

Location: 

Zoom

Phillip B. Williams is researching, writing, and revising poems (title: “Mutiny”) and prose (title: “Threshold”). Within both genres, he hopes to research and explore Black folklore, African-diasporic mythologies and spiritual practices, and alternative ways of documenting Black selfhood outside of the human/nonhuman dichotomy. 

Free and open to the public. To view this event online, individuals will...

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2021 Feb 24

Latinx Modernism and the Spirit of Latinoamericanismo

12:00pm

Location: 

Zoom

At the Harvard Radcliffe Institute, John Alba Cutler will be working on a new book examining the prodigious literary archive of early-20th-century Spanish-language newspapers in the United States. Newspapers in Latinx communities from New York to San Diego published tens of thousands of poems, short stories, chronicles, and serialized novels....

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2021 Mar 05

The Stories We Tell and the Objects We Keep: Asian American Women and the Archives

1:00pm to 3:30pm

Location: 

Zoom

The stories of Asian American women extend far beyond the geographic borders of the United States. Inspired by tales and objects from family history, their narratives often reflect the transnational nature of Asian American women’s lives. Despite the importance of these narratives to expanding and complicating our understanding of war, migration, inequity, and difference, the accounts and perspectives of Asian American women have often been overlooked in formal records, and the tangible objects providing critical evidence of their histories have been ignored.

This program will...

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2021 Feb 02

Protest as Politics: African American Young Adults, Reimagining Democracy

4:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

Lecture by Cathy J. Cohen, David and Mary Winton Green Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago. 
 
During these unprecedented times, we have watched young people—a great many of them African Americans—taking to the streets in all 50 states in support of justice for George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, while also seeking to address the current failures of policing, criminal justice, and the economy; as well as the existence of white supremacy and anti-Blackness. How does the precarious position of African American young adults...

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2021 Feb 09

A Conversation with Poet Tonya M. Foster

12:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

Tonya M. Foster’s writing and research focus on ideas of place and emplacement, on intersections between the visual and the written, and on mapping the 20th- and 21st-century African Americas. During her Radcliffe year, Foster is completing a book-length manuscript of poetry, “AHotB,” that takes up Fanny Lou Hamer’s idea that “a black women’s body is never hers alone.” 
 
Tonya M. Foster is a 2020-2021 Lisa Goldberg Fellow at the Harvard Radcliffe Institute and the George and Judy Marcus Endowed Chair in Poetry at San Francisco State University.

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