Black History Month 2021

Celebrate Black History Month at Harvard from February 1 to March 1, 2021. Black History Month began in 1926 as a smaller week-long celebration, which was organized by what is now known as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH). The month of February officially became "Black History Month" in 1976 and gives us the opportunity to acknowledge the cultural and historical contributions of Black/African American people in the United States. To learn more about Black History Month please visit: https://www.history.com/topics/black-history/black-history-month 

2021 Jan 27

The Fugitive Life of Black Teaching: A History of Pedagogy and Power

Date: 

Wednesday, January 27, 2021, 12:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

Jarvis R. Givens, Assistant Professor at Radcliffe wearing a blue suit with white shirt.

Jarvis R. Givens, the Suzanne Young Murray Assistant Professor at Radcliffe and an assistant professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, studies the relationship among race, power, and schooling in the United States. His first book, Fugitive Pedagogy: Carter G. Woodson and the Art of Black Teaching (Harvard University Press, forthcoming)traces the subversive and often covert educational practices black people employed to challenge racial domination during slavery through Jim Crow.

As a Radcliffe fellow, Jarvis Givens completed his first book, Fugitive Pedagogy: Carter G. Woodson and the Art of Black Teaching (Harvard University Press, 2021). This work explores the subversive history of Black education, focusing particularly on the concealed pedagogical practices of African American teachers. Givens uses the life of Carter G. Woodson (1875–1950)—the groundbreaking historian, founder of Black History Month, and legendary educator under Jim Crow—to frame this story. Interested in more than Woodson himself, however, the book recuperates the networked world of teachers to which he belonged, a world in which educators crafted a pedagogical model to challenge the hostile educational curricula, policies, and political economic forces that undermined their work. Black educators intentionally kept critical aspects of their work away from the public eye. In doing so, they developed what Givens calls a tradition of “fugitive pedagogy”—a theory and practice of Black education in America. Woodson’s life and work are presented as one of the greatest exemplars of this tradition: Woodson’s first teachers were his formerly enslaved uncles; he himself taught for nearly 30 years; and he spent his life partnering with educators, artists, and activists to fight against what he termed “the mis-education of the Negro.” Forged in slavery and embodied by Woodson, this tradition of escape remains essential for teachers and students today.

Givens earned his PhD in African American studies from the University of California, Berkeley, and is a two-time Ford Foundation fellow. He recently received a $610,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to codevelop The Black Teacher Archives, a digital repository to preserve the more than 100-year history of Colored Teacher Associations.

You can register for this event by visiting www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2021-jarvis-r-givens-fellow-presentation-virtual.

This event is free. All are welcome to attend. 

2021 Jan 28

A Catalyst for Humanity: Isabel Wilkerson in Conversation with Don Lemon

Date: 

Thursday, January 28, 2021, 1:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

Michelle A. Williams, Dean of the Faculty at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, is pleased to present 'A Catalyst for Humanity.' What are the invisible social strata that define and divide America? How does this unseen ranking underlie racism? And how do caste dynamics systematically lessen the value of Black lives? Join Pulitzer Prize winner Isabel Wilkerson, author of Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents, and esteemed social scientist David Williams for a conversation about embedded power inequities–and their cost to us all. Moderated by CNN anchor Don Lemon. 
 
Presented with the Nieman Foundation and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Hosted by The Forum at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. 

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 02

Protest as Politics: African American Young Adults, Reimagining Democracy

Date: 

Tuesday, February 2, 2021, 4:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

Lecture by Cathy J. Cohen, David and Mary Winton Green Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago. 
 
During these unprecedented times, we have watched young people—a great many of them African Americans—taking to the streets in all 50 states in support of justice for George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, while also seeking to address the current failures of policing, criminal justice, and the economy; as well as the existence of white supremacy and anti-Blackness. How does the precarious position of African American young adults facilitate a reimagining of democracy? What does this reimagining mean for American politics? 
 
Discussant: Lawrence D. Bobo, dean of social science, W. E. B. Du Bois Professor of the Social Sciences, and Harvard College Professor, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences 
 
Hosted by the Harvard Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. 

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 02

Protest as Politics: African American Young Adults, Reimagining Democracy

Date: 

Tuesday, February 2, 2021, 4:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

During these unprecedented times, we have watched young people—a great many of them African Americans—taking to the streets in all 50 states in support of justice for George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, while also seeking to address the current failures of policing, criminal justice, and the economy; as well as the existence of white supremacy and anti-Blackness. How does the precarious position of African American young adults facilitate a reimagining of democracy? What does this reimagining mean for American politics? Register online. Lecture by Cathy J. Cohen, the David and Mary Winton Green Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago. She formerly served as chair of the Department of Political Science, director of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture and deputy provost for Graduate Education at the University of Chicago. She is a recipient of numerous awards and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 03

Medical Apartheid Goes Viral

Date: 

Wednesday, February 3, 2021, 5:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

Medical Apartheid Goes Viral: How Infection Catalyzes Bioethical Erosion 
Harriet A. Washington, MA

The Harvard Medical School Center for Bioethics is partnering with the Tuskegee University National Center for Bioethics in Research and Health Care on a series of events in acknowledgement of Black History Month.  This event is a part of that series.

Additional details about the series and resources can be found on the Harvard Center's website:  https://bioethics.hms.harvard.edu/events/black-history-month-event-series

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 04

Human Rights, Civil Rights, and the Struggle for Racial Justice

Date: 

Thursday, February 4, 2021, 5:00pm to 6:30pm

Location: 

Virtual

From documenting historical incidents of mass racial violence to taking protests against police brutality to international forums, social justice lawyers have long turned to human rights law and strategies to advocate for racial justice in the United States. At the same time, US legacies of exceptionalism, isolationism and nationalism pose challenges for what is a fundamentally universalist human rights project. This event will explore how international human rights approaches are being used in conjunction with domestic civil rights advocacy to push for law and policy change in the United States. Panelists will speak about their work raising awareness of, and seeking accountability for, racial injustice, while reflecting on circumstances in which the international human rights framework presents an imperfect vehicle for mobilizing change.

Speakers will include:

  • Nicole Austin-Hillery, Executive Director, U.S. Program, Human Rights Watch
  • Maryum Jordan, Counsel for the Special Litigation and Advocacy Project, Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under the Law
  • Gay McDougall, Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence, Leitner Center for International Law and Justice, Fordham Law School

Moderated by: Aminta Ossom, Clinical Instructor and Lecturer on Law, International Human Rights Clinic

This event is organized by the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School and co-sponsored by the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice, HLS Advocates for Human Rights, and the Harvard Human Rights Journal. It is the second in a series of events examining racial justice and human rights. Register on zoom via the HRP website.

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 05

Lecture in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Date: 

Friday, February 5, 2021, 2:00pm to 4:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

FAS Division of Science will host the 2nd annual lecture in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on Friday, February 5, 2021, from 2 p.m. - 4 p.m. via Zoom. Special guest speaker Dr. Freeman Hrabowski, III, President of The University of Maryland, Baltimore County, will share remarks. Students, postdocs, staff, and faculty within FAS and the broader Harvard University community are welcome.  

If you or your colleagues have questions or need accommodations, please contact Tasha Thomas at tasha_thomas@fas.harvard.edu

Register for Freeman Hrabowski Lecture in honor of MLK

Portrait of Dr. Freeman Hrabowski smiling in a yellow necktie and black suit

2021 Feb 05

Valiant Voices and Vision

Date: 

Friday, February 5, 2021, 4:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

The Harvard Athletics Black Varsity Association (HABVA) is set to host Valiant Voices and Vision on Friday, Feb. 5, at 4 p.m. ET. The hour-long webinar will feature Black Harvard alumni and former varsity athletes engaging in a powerful panel discussion on race and sport, finding their voice, and creating systemic change in 2021. 
 
The star-studded panel features former Harvard All-American and professional tennis player James Blake, Chris Egi '18 (men's basketball), Koma Gandy Fischbein '95 (women's soccer, rugby) and All-American Gabby Thomas '19 (women's track and field). 
 
The inaugural discussion is slated to be moderated by LZ Granderson, a sports and culture columnist for the Los Angeles Times. Granderson also serves as a political contributor for ABC and co-hosts a radio show on 710 AM ESPN in Los Angeles. 

WATCH HERE

2021 Feb 05

Celebration of the Arts: A Commemoration of Black Art & Icons

Date: 

Friday, February 5, 2021, 6:30pm to 8:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

In Celebration of Black History Month, GCP's Common Connections team will honor black ancestors & icons through virtual spoken word (poetry) & music performances. 

We will gather virtually to listen to live poetry and jazz performances and honoring black icons and how their work still impacts the next generation of black artists, intellectuals, and communities.

Our featured poets include: 
Poetic Theorist & Harvard Divinity School Alumna, Azmera Hammouri-Davis & 
Prolific Poet, Author, Professor, and Poetry Editor of The Harvard Review, Major Jackson

Participants will be able to engage in a live talk-back session with both artist during the community event.  

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 09

A Conversation with Poet Tonya M. Foster

Date: 

Tuesday, February 9, 2021, 12:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

Tonya M. Foster’s writing and research focus on ideas of place and emplacement, on intersections between the visual and the written, and on mapping the 20th- and 21st-century African Americas. During her Radcliffe year, Foster is completing a book-length manuscript of poetry, “AHotB,” that takes up Fanny Lou Hamer’s idea that “a black women’s body is never hers alone.” 
 
Tonya M. Foster is a 2020-2021 Lisa Goldberg Fellow at the Harvard Radcliffe Institute and the George and Judy Marcus Endowed Chair in Poetry at San Francisco State University.

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 09

Community Spaces - BIPOC / Multiracial

Date: 

Tuesday, February 9, 2021, 5:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

Zoom

This event is for all members of the Harvard community, including students, staff, faculty, postdocs, research fellows, and academic personnel, who identify as a part of the BIPOC/multiracial community. The space will provide support for community members who are experiencing heightened anxiety in response to the current moment (Covid, racial injustice, political tensions, etc.). For more information about the community spaces series, please visit: https://dib.harvard.edu/community-spaces

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 10

Enduring Ethical Lessons from the Past

Date: 

Wednesday, February 10, 2021, 5:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

Enduring Ethical Lessons from the Past: Learning from the USPHS Syphilis Study at Tuskegee 

Lillie Head and Riggins R. Earl, Jr., PhD 

The Harvard Medical School Center for Bioethics is partnering with the Tuskegee University National Center for Bioethics in Research and Health Care on a series of events in acknowledgement of Black History Month.  This event is a part of that series.

Additional details about the series and resources can be found on the Harvard Center's website:  https://bioethics.hms.harvard.edu/events/black-history-month-event-series

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 10

Where Do We Go from Here? Making Progress Toward Racial Equity

Date: 

Wednesday, February 10, 2021, 6:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

Up close photos of two of the event guest speakers.

In his inaugural address, President Biden denounced the rise of political extremism and white supremacy, stating: “A cry for racial justice some 400 years in the making moves us. A cry that can’t be any more desperate or any more clear. And now a rise of political extremism, white supremacy, domestic terrorism that we must confront and we will defeat.” 
 
In recognition of Black History Month, Harvard Kennedy School Academic Dean Iris Bohnet will moderate a conversation with Dr. Robert Livingston regarding the most effective path for addressing systemic racism. The interview will draw from Professor Livingston’s newly published book The Conversation: How Seeking and Speaking the Truth about Racism Can Radically Transform Individuals and Organizations.  

Cosponsored by HKS Women and Public Policy Program and Center for Public Leadership. 

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 11

Black Religion, Spirituality & Culture Conference - B.L.A.C.K. (Black Liberation, Activism, Community, & Kinship)

Date: 

Thursday, February 11, 2021 (All day) to Friday, February 12, 2021 (All day)

Location: 

Virtual

Feb. 11th 6pm-7:30pm EST

Feb. 12th 10:10am-7:05pm EST

Powered by Harambee: Students of African Descent at Harvard Divinity School The Black Religion, Spirituality & Culture Fifth Annual Conference aims to create a safe and meaningful space for B.I.P.O.C. cultural-heritages and traditions of being and becoming. We will facilitate much-needed conversations around the global militarization of police and police brutality against Black and Brown folx across the African Diaspora. Participants will engage in high-performance dance, movement, listening to panelists expand on the dance traditions of Vodou, Regla de Ocha-Ifá, Candomblé, Umbanda, and Traditional Ifá. The panels will flesh out Indigenous and African ways of being in community. The panels will also explore the dire need to come together as change agents to radically impact academia and our communities positively. Other panels will discuss the work being done by HDS alumni and scholarship undertaken by students at various institutions.

B.L.A.C.K. event poster with green and red bordering.

2021 Feb 11

5th Annual Black Religion, Spirituality & Culture Conference, Harvard Divinity School

Date: 

Thursday, February 11, 2021 (All day) to Friday, February 12, 2021 (All day)

Location: 

Virtual

The Black Religion, Spirituality & Culture Fifth Annual Conference aims to create a safe and meaningful space for B.I.P.O.C. cultural-heritages and traditions of being and becoming. We will facilitate much-needed conversations around the global militarization of police and police brutality against Black and Brown folx across the African Diaspora. Students will engage in high-performance dance, movement, listening to panelists expand on the dance traditions of Vodou, Regla de Ocha-Ifá, Candomblé, Umbanda, and Traditional Ifá. The panels will flesh out Indigenous and African ways of being in community. The panels will also explore the dire need to come together as change agents to radically impact academia and our communities positively. Other panels will discuss the work being done by HDS alumni and scholarship undertaken by current HDS students.

Register for Black Religion, Spirituality & Culture Conference

Black divininty school student speaking on stage with a mic

2021 Feb 11

And So On: Reading and Conversation with Kiese Laymon

Date: 

Thursday, February 11, 2021, 4:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

Kiese Laymon will talk with Courtney R. Baker about whether the actual histories of American colleges and universities should be ripe sites for Black American horror and comedic narratives. Laymon will create a live novella and a live essay during this talk, while questioning the ethics of making art “for” an audience longing for both titillation and innocence from the horrific histories of Black Americans in and around American institutions of higher learning. 
 
The Julia S. Phelps Annual Lecture in the Arts and Humanities was established to honor the late Julia S. Phelps, longtime instructor in the Radcliffe Seminars, and is supported by the generous contributions of her family, friends, and colleagues. 
 
Kiese Laymon is a 2020–2021 William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Fellow at the Harvard Radcliffe Institute, and Hubert H. McAlexander Professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Mississippi. 
 
Discussant is Courtney R. Baker, Associate Professor for the Department of English at the University of California, Riverside. 

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 11

Black Voters Matter: A Post-Election Conversation with Latosha Brown

Date: 

Thursday, February 11, 2021, 4:30pm

Location: 

Virtual

Join a post-election conversation with LaTosha Brown, co-founder of Black Voters Matter Fund and co-founder of the Southern Black Girls Consortium.

Ms. Brown is a 2020-2021 Hauser Leader at the Center for Public Leadership and a 2020-2021 American Democracy Fellow at Harvard's Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History. Throughout the 2020 U.S. election, Ms. Brown led the We Got the Power bus tour across the U.S. South to register people to vote and galvanize Black voter participation. In a recent interview, Ms. Brown said "We wanted people, we wanted Black voters in particular, to feel a sense of their power and their agency, and in spite of all odds, what we could do in pushing this country forward." 
 
This event will be moderated by Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, Race and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School and the Suzanne Young Murray Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies. 
 
Co-sponsored by The Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History and the Women and Public Policy Program. Please contact cwc@fas.harvard.edu in advance of the session to request accomodations or ask about access. 

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 16

Community Spaces - Black/African American

Date: 

Tuesday, February 16, 2021, 5:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

Zoom

This event is for all members of the Harvard community, including students, staff, faculty, postdocs, research fellows, and academic personnel, who identify as a part of the Black/African American community. The space will provide support for community members who are experiencing heightened anxiety in response to the current moment (Covid, racial injustice, political tensions, etc.). For more information about the community spaces series, please visit: https://dib.harvard.edu/community-spaces

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 17

Clerking While Black: Live Zoom Webinar

Date: 

Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 12:00pm

Location: 

Zoom

Have you seen the article, A Peek Behind the Curtain: The Inner- Workings of the Judiciary, and Why Judges Should Address the Lack of Diversity Among Law Clerks?  Former judicial law clerks from HLS share their experiences of “clerking while Black,” and how you can launch your career through clerking. Co-sponsored by OCS and BLSA.

Please log in to CSM under events to register for this event with your HLS email.

Persons with disabilities who wish to request accommodations or who have questions about access, please contact ocs@law.harvard.edu in advance of this event.

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 17

The Politics of Health Policy

Date: 

Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 5:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

The Politics of Health Policy:Integrating Racial Justice into Health Care andClinical Research 

Daniel Dawes, JD 

The Harvard Medical School Center for Bioethics is partnering with the Tuskegee University National Center for Bioethics in Research and Health Care on a series of events in acknowledgement of Black History Month.  This event is a part of that series.

Additional details about the series and resources can be found on the Harvard Center's website:  https://bioethics.hms.harvard.edu/events/black-history-month-event-series

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 18

I'll Make Me a World: Voices for Diversity in STEM

Date: 

Thursday, February 18, 2021, 6:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

The conversation will be moderated by Dr. Alexis Stokes, Assistant Dean for Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging at Harvard SEAS 

Safroadu (Saf) Yeboah-Amankwah is senior vice president and chief strategy officer (CSO) at Intel Corporation. Yeboah-Amankwah leads Intel’s Global Strategy Office, including Intel Capital, and works with the executive team on developing and driving growth-oriented strategies.

Yeboah-Amankwah joined Intel in 2020 from McKinsey & Company, where he was a senior partner and global head of the Transformation Practice for the Telecom, Media and Technology (TMT) practice. Prior to that role, he served as managing partner for South Africa and head of McKinsey’s TMT and Digital practice for Africa, among other roles. 

Yeboah-Amankwah holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a former board member of the United Negro College Fund. 

For more information about this event, please visit https://illmakemeaworld.weebly.com/ 

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 18

Hidden Figures: Celebrating Black Achievement in Space

Date: 

Thursday, February 18, 2021, 6:00pm

Location: 

Virtual

Join us in observance and celebration of Black History Month when the Institute of Politics hosts a conversation between NASA Astronaut Dr. Jeanette J. Epps and Charles F. Bolden Jr., Major General, USMC (Ret.), 12th NASA Administrator, and member of the Institute of Politics Senior Advisory Committee. 

Dr. Epps is slated to make history as the first Black woman crew member to work and live on the International Space Station in 2021. She will be joined in conversation with fellow former Astronaut Charles Bolden to reflect upon their challenges and success of their unique paths and contributions to public service and science. 

REGISTER HERE

2021 Feb 19

The Conversation: with Professor Robert Livingston

Date: 

Friday, February 19, 2021, 3:00pm to 3:45pm

Location: 

Virtual

Join us to discuss Professor Robert Livingston’s new book: Founded on principles of psychology, sociology, management, and behavioral economics, The Conversation is an essential tool to jump-start dialogue on racism and bias and transform well-intentioned statements on diversity into concrete actions.

REGISTER HERE

 

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